Prawn & Pork Gyoza

Every month or so, if not less, my family likes to make our own dumplings. For the Chinese, these are known as  “shui jiao”, and to the Japanese as “gyoza”, but for the purposes of making the recipe title easier to pronounce, let’s just call them gyoza 😉

Mum and dad have always made them from scratch, mixing together plain flour and water into a springy, light dough before dividing it out into thimble-sized spheres for my sister and I to roll out into the dumpling skins. They would be filled with a mixture of pork mince, ginger and garlic chives, before being deftly creased by my mother and then dropped into a large saucepan of boiling water to tumble and cook. Whether they were straight after being freshly boiled or the leftovers pan-fried the next day, both were delicious and dumplings are the only thing from Chinese cuisine that I never get bored by.

However when it comes to dinner for one, I can hardly be bothered to make my own dumpling skins. I found this recipe from Valli Little’s Love to Cook, and it resembled my mother’s recipe so much I decided to adapt parts of it. Depending on how much mixture you stuff in each dumpling, it should make approximately 15-20 gyozas. If you can’t eat 15 gyozas yourself, these also freeze (uncooked) very well.

You will need:

  • 125g green prawn meat;
  • 125g pork mince;
  • 2 eschalots, finely chopped;
  • 2 tablespoons grated ginger;
  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil;
  • 2 teaspoons soy sauce;
  • 1/4 teaspoon cornflour;
  • 24 circular gow gee/shui jiao wrappers (just make sure it’s not the yellow egg pastry wrappers);
  • 80ml peanut oil;
  • 2 spring onions, thinly sliced at an angle;
  • black vinegar and soy sauce to serve.

To make the dipping sauce, whisk together 50ml of the black vinegar and 50ml of the soy suace in a bowl, then set aside until ready to serve. Feel free to add freshly sliced chilli if you like a bit of a kick!

To make the gyoza filling, combine all of the ingredients, except the wrappers, peanut oil and spring onion, in a food processor and pulse to just combined (do not over-process).

IMG_2546

Holding a wrapper in the palm of one hand, place one tablespoon of filling in the centre of the wrapper. Wet edges of the wrapper with a little cold water, then fold the edges together, crimping edges to seal. Place, crimped edge up, on a lined tray. Repeat with remaining wrappers and filling.

IMG_2548

IMG_2550

Place a large frypan (with a lid) over medium heat and add a tablespoon of oil. Place gyoza in the pan (do not overcrowd), crimped edge up, in pan and cook, uncovered, for 3-4 minutes until browned on the base.

IMG_2553

Add 1/4 cup (60ml) of water to the pan, and then quickly cover with lid and steam gyoza for 2 minutes or until cooked through and you can see the gyozas have swelled. Remove the lid then add another tablespoon of oil to the pan and cook gyoza for a further minute until the bases are crisp. Remove from pan and keep warm, then repeat the process with the remaining gyoza and oil.

IMG_2555

Transfer the gyoza to a serving platter, scatter with spring onion and serve with the dipping sauce.

IMG_2567

Having the gyoza with an Asahi or Sapporo Japanese beer may have been more appropriate but a light, crisp cider was enough of a win 🙂

4 Comments Add yours

  1. I’ve never tried making my own dumplings skins but there’s something very therapeutic about making tray upon tray of dumplings whilst sitting in front of the telly 🙂

  2. thelittleswedishgirl says:

    Not to ignore the beautiful dumplings, but being Swedish, the cider deserves my highest praises! Can a summer evening get much better?!

  3. Tina @ bitemeshowme says:

    aww you made them look so pretty!

  4. Daniel says:

    They do look beautiful!! I bet they taste even better than they look.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s