Moroccan Yoghurt Cake

Whenever I go grocery shopping, I’m usually a Woman On A Mission. Charge in with my trolley or basket. Assess the layout of the supermarket: fruit and vegetables first, so I can pick and sort while my load is light and hands free, and then strategically up and down the aisles; buzzing past teenagers crowded in the soft drink aisle and manoeuvring myself around the trolley traffic jam that inevitably happens around the frozen goods. Picking up dropped toys mid-stride and handing it back into the damp grasp of screaming baby. Bending and twisting around the stocking trolleys, eyes scanning over use-by-dates, bumping freezer doors closed with a quick thrust of a deft hip.

But the one thing which always holds me up (other than the ever-excruciating wait at the checkouts for the family who has decided to used the self-serve scanners for two trolleys full of a groceries) is the dairy aisle. The yoghurt aisle is probably the most daunting. Do you want probiotic? 98% fat free? Sugar free? Strawberry, vanilla, forest berry, mango, peach? Extra creamy delicious yoghurt or yoghurt that’s a bit runny but hey it will make you feel skinny eating it? Natural yoghurt which we all know is the healthiest but when on your morning granola will make you wince like you’ve licked sandpaper?

I’ve gotten into the habit of just buying my regular Greek yoghurt unless something else is on special. I usually add it to my smoothies or granola, but on the off chance I didn’t feel like digging into the yoghurt pot for a few days, at the end of the week I like to try and use up the yoghurt into a cake or some muffins.

With the addition of almond meal and a generous full cup of yoghurt to this cake, it gives it a deliciously light and moist texture…not to mention the flavour. A heady spice of warm cinnamon, the subtle note of orange blossom water, and the sweet sour burst of juicy pomegranate seeds make this simple cake into something incredibly exotic. And not to mention it looks pretty hot on your dining table…

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This recipe serves about eight people comfortably. But people may want more after having a taste…

20 minutes preparation, 35 minutes for baking

You will need:

  • 1 + 1/3C (200g) self-raising flour;
  • 1 cup (125g) almond meal;
  • 2/3 cup (150g) caster sugar;
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder;
  • 2 eggs;
  • 1 cup (280g) thick Greek natural yoghurt,
  • 150ml vegetable oil;
  • Finely grated zest of one Navel orange;
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon;
  • 3 teaspoons orange blossom water;
  • 1 + 1/2C (225g) icing sugar, sifted;
  • 2 tablespoons milk;
  • Pomegranate seeds, to decorate;
  • Plain flour, for greasing.

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees Celcius. Grease and flour a 2 litre (25cm) bundt pan. Shake out the residual flour well.

Combine the flour, almond meal, caster sugar and baking powder in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk the eggs, yoghurt and oil until combined, then stir into the dry ingredients.

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Fold in the orange zest, cinnamon and two teaspoons of the orange blossom water. Spoon into the pan and bake for 30 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the cake comes out clean.

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Don’t be too mollified if your cake looks a little pale; you’re yet to turn it out. Cool it first in the tin for five minutes or so, before turning it out onto a wire rack to cool completely.

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At this stage, it should smell like one gloriously huge cinnamon doughnut. Frankly, it will look like one too. So wait until it cools down before you begin to ice this giant doughnut.

When it’s completely cool to the touch, stir the icing sugar (no need for sifting, thank goodness), milk and remaining one teaspoon of orange blossom water in a small bowl until have a soft, drizzling consistency. Jackson Pollock it all over your doughnut.

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When the icing is semi-set, transfer it to a plate and scatter over the pomegranate seeds to serve.

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Pure perfection. Beauty inside and out – never too much to ask for ;)

2 responses to “Moroccan Yoghurt Cake

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